Universal Time To Mountain Time

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Areas with same time currently (UTC -7). Mountain Standard Time (MST) is 7 hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). This time zone is in use during standard time in: North America. This time zone is often called Mountain Time Zone. Coordinated Universal Time or UTC is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude, and is not adjusted for daylight saving time. It is effectively a successor to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

The Mountain Time Zone refers to time zone which observes time where seven hours are subtracted from GMT (UTC/GMT -7). This is called Mountain Standard Time (MST). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time of the 105th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory.
Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) refers to time where six hours are subtracted from GMT (UTC/GMT -6). This time is used during the daylight saving time, which is observed throughout the sunnier months of the year, during the spring, summer and autumn.

Time Difference. Mountain Daylight Time is 6 hours behind of Universal Time Coordinated 5:30 am 05:30 in MDT is 11:30 am 11:30 in UTC. MST to UTC call time Best time for a conference call or a meeting is between 8am-11am in MST which corresponds to 3pm-6pm in UTC. Time Zones in the United States. The Mountain Time Zone refers to time zone which observes time where seven hours are subtracted from GMT (UTC/GMT -7). This is called Mountain Standard Time (MST). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time of the 105th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory.

Mountain Time (MT)

In the United States and Canada, Mountain Time Zone is generically called Mountain Time (MT). Specifically, it is Mountain Standard Time during winter, and Mountain Daylight Time when daylight saving time is observed. The name of the time zone refers to the fact that the Rocky Mountains, which range from northwestern Canada to the U.S. state of New Mexico, are located almost entirely in this time zone.
Effective since 2007, the local time changes from MST 02:00 to MDT 03:00 on the second Sunday in March and returns to MST at 02:00 MDT to 01:00 MST on the first Sunday in November.

Arizona

Most of Arizona does not observe daylight saving time, and during the spring, summer, and autumn months, it is on the same time as Pacific Daylight Time, though it is still called Mountain Standard Time in Arizona. The Navajo Nation, most of which lies within Arizona, does observe daylight saving time, although the Hopi Nation, as well as some Arizona state offices lying within the Navajo Nation, do not.

Daylight Saving Time Information

The Beginning and end dates of the daylight saving time in the United States and in Canada. Daylight saving time starting and ending dates are mostly different in Mexico comparing to Canada and the USA dates which are presented here. A few Mexican border cities follow the USA daylight saving times.

YearBeginsEnds
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029

Daylight saving time start and and dates in Canada and in the USA.

Universal Time To Mountain Time

North American Time Zones

The time zones in North America, in the west from Hawaii and Alaska to the east cost of USA and Canada and all the way to Nova Scotia and Newfoundaland.

Hours from UTC/GMTStandard TimeDaylight Saving Time
-10Hawaii-Aleutian
-9AlaskaHawaii-Aleutian
-8PacificAlaska
-7MountainPacific
-6CentralMountain
-5EasternCentral
-4AtlanticEastern
-3:30Newfoundland
-3Atlantic
-2:30Newfoundland

Time zones in North America.

GMT and UTC

Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) is originally referring to mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT and Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) can be seen equivalent when fractions of a second are not important.

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Original KB number: 2642044

Summary

Although time may seem like a simple human concept that lets everyone across the globe receive a meeting request and then attend the meeting at the same time, the concept is actually very complex. This article describes how Microsoft Outlook 2010 and later versions achieve this goal by using a combination of items such as Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), time zone offset, daylight saving time (DST) rules, and Windows time zone settings.

More information

Before we examine the details of how time zone normalization works in Outlook, it is important to define some important terms.

  • UTC

    UTC signifies Coordinated Universal Time. Think of this as the true time on planet Earth that never changes (except for minor leap seconds here and there to account for changes in the planet's rotation).

    For more information about UTC, see Coordinated Universal Time.

  • Time zone offset

    Time zone offset is the time for your geographic region in relation to UTC. For example, the Pacific Time zone is 8 hours behind UTC. Therefore, if it is 8 P.M. UTC, the time in the Pacific Time zone is noon.

  • Daylight saving time rules

    Daylight saving time rules are the rules by which certain regions seasonally change their time zone offset. These rules include both a start date and an end date for the DST period and also the number of hours for the time zone offset. For example, in the summer, the time in the Pacific Time Zone may be calculated as UTC ‒ 7 hours, whereas for the rest year, the time is calculated as UTC ‒ 8 hours.

  • Windows global time zone database

    Windows stores all time zone and DST rules for the whole planet in the Windows global time zone database. The database is stored in the Windows registry under the following subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindows NTCurrentVersionTime Zones

  • Windows current time zone settings

    Windows current time zone settings are the settings Windows is currently using to determine the time for your computer. Of all the rules in the Windows global time zone database, only one set of DST rules can be applied. The Windows current time stores the set of rules that is currently being used to calculate time on your computer.

    The Windows current time zone settings are stored in the Windows registry under the following subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControlTimeZoneInformation

  • Computer time

    Computer time is the actual time that is displayed by Windows, as seen in the following screenshot of the notification area.

    If you select this part of the Windows notification area, an enhanced calendar and clock are displayed.

    You can select Change date and time settings to examine the current time zone settings for your computer (Screenshot for this step is listed below).

How computer time is calculated

Computer time is calculated by taking UTC time, adding an offset that is based on the time zone configured for your computer, and then optionally adjusting the offset for daylight saving time (depending on the DST rules). The formula that is used to calculate computer time is as follows:

UTC + Time zone offset + DST offset

Be aware that this method represents how people have agreed to think about the concept of time. This method is a world standard, and it is how Microsoft implements time on your computer.

How Outlook handles time zone offset and DST rules in calendar items

It might seem like a simple task to make sure that two people who have the same meeting request attend the meeting at the same time. However, when you add scenarios in which time zones are changing with different daylight saving time rules, the calculation becomes complex.

To see how Outlook handles this situation, consider the following scenario:

  • The meeting organizer has the following Windows current time zone settings:

    Pacific Time zone (UTC‒8; DST starts on March 13, 2011; DST ends on November 6, 2011)

  • The meeting attendee has the following Windows current time zone settings:

    Eastern Time zone (UTC‒5; DST starts on March 13, 2011; DST ends on November 6, 2011)

  • The meeting organizer is creating a meeting on their calendar for November 20, 2011, at 7 A.M.

Step 1 - Organizer sends meeting request with time zone information

On the organizer's computer, the meeting in the request is created to start at 7 A.M.

On the organizer's computer, Outlook sends the meeting request. The request contains the following information in the message properties:

Meeting is at 3 P.M. UTC on November 20, 2011
My time zone is Pacific (UTC‒8)
DST starts on March 13, 2011, DST ends on November 6, 2011, and the offset is +1

After the meeting is created, the government mandates a new law according to which, in the Pacific Time Zone, DST starts on February 2, 2011, and ends on December 1, 2011. Because there are new time zone rules, and the appointment falls in the time period in which a new time zone rule is applied, normalization occurs (steps 2 and 3). This normalization is depicted in the following figure.

Step 2 - Attendee's Outlook determines intended local time

On the attendee's computer, Outlook calculates the intended local time of the meeting based on the information that is included the meeting request:

What Timezone Is 4 Hours Ahead Of Mountain Time

Intended local time = UTC at meeting creation + offset for time zone + offset for DST at meeting creation

  • UTC at meeting creation is 3 P.M. UTC
  • Offset for creation time zone (Pacific) is ‒8
  • Offset for DST for Pacific Time at meeting creation is 0

Intended local time = 3 P.M. UTC + (‒8 hours for time zone offset) + (0 hours for DST offset) = 7 A.M. Pacific Time

Step 3 - Attendee's Outlook determines normalized UTC time

On the attendee's computer, Outlook normalizes the time of the meeting based on the Windows global time zone database on the attendee's computer to determine the UTC time.

UTC at meeting start = intended local time ‒ offset for time zone ‒ offset for DST

  • Intended local time is 7 A.M. Pacific Time (based on the calculation in step 2)
  • Offset for creation time zone (Pacific) is ‒8
  • Offset for DST for Pacific Time at meeting start is +1
  • UTC at meeting start = 7 A.M. intended local time ‒ (‒8 hours for time zone) ‒ (1 hour for DST)

UTC at meeting start = 7 A.M. + 8 hours ‒ 1 hour = 2 P.M. UTC

Step 4 - Attendee determines correct time for this appointment for the attendee's time settings

On the attendee's computer, Outlook converts UTC to the local computer time by using the Windows current time zone settings.

Local start time = UTC at meeting start + offset for local time zone + offset for DST at meeting start

  • UTC at meeting start is 2 P.M. UTC (based on the calculation in step 3)
  • Offset for local time zone (Eastern) is ‒5
  • Offset for DST in Eastern Time at meeting start for local time zone is +1

Local start time = 2 P.M. UTC + (‒5 hours for time zone) + 1 hour for DST

This equates to 10 A.M. Eastern Time, attendee's local computer time, and this is the time for which the meeting is scheduled on the attendee's calendar.

Universal Time To Mountain Time

Note

Difference Between Mst And Mdt

One core issue is that if you do not select Automatically adjust clock for Daylight Saving Time on the attendee's computer, there can be a mismatch in the UTC offset (off by one hour) between the time zone rules in the Windows global time zone database and the Windows current time zone settings. To select Automatically adjust clock for Daylight Saving Time, select Change time zone in the Date and Time dialog box to display the Time Zone Settings dialog box (Screen shot for this step is listed below).

Is Mountain Time 2 Hours Ahead Of Pacific Time

For more information about how to manage daylight saving time and time zone configurations and updates, see Daylight Saving Time Help and Support Center.